August 6, 2010

Round Robin DNS: Load Balancing technology for Servers

Free Child Walking on White Round Spheres Bala...
Round Robin DNS is a technique of load distribution, load balancing, or fault-tolerance provisioning multiple, redundant Internet Protocol service hosts, e.g., Web servers, FTP servers, by managing the Domain Name System's (DNS) responses to address requests from client computers according to an appropriate statistical model.

In its simplest implementation Round-robin DNS works by responding to DNS requests not only with a single IP address, but a list of IP addresses of several servers that host identical services. The order in which IP addresses from the list are returned is the basis for the term round robin. With each DNS response, the IP address sequence in the list is permuted. Usually, basic IP clients attempt connections with the first address returned from a DNS query so that on different connection attempts clients would receive service from different providers, thus distributing the overall load among servers.

There is no standard procedure for deciding which address will be used by the requesting application - a few resolvers attempt to re-order the list to give priority to numerically "closer" networks. Some desktop clients do try alternate addresses after a connection timeout of 30-45 seconds.



Round robin DNS is often used for balancing the load of geographically-distributed Web servers. For example, a company has one domain name and three identical web sites residing on three servers with three different IP addresses. When one user accesses the home page it will be sent to the first IP address. The second user who accesses the home page will be sent to the next IP address, and the third user will be sent to the third IP address. In each case, once the IP address is given out, it goes to the end of the list. The fourth user, therefore, will be sent to the first IP address, and so forth.

Many IRC networks use round robin DNS to distribute users among the servers on their networks. Indeed, virtually all large and established networks have round robin DNS implementations for each continent or country in which they have servers - so users can use a 'random' server but not necessarily one local to them.

 

About the Author

Tomboy

Author & Editor

Has laoreet percipitur ad. Vide interesset in mei, no his legimus verterem. Et nostrum imperdiet appellantur usu, mnesarchum referrentur id vim.

Post a Comment

 
Iwebslog Blog © 2015 - Designed by Templateism.com